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A Dictionary of Sociology (Fourth Edition, first published in 1994, 1998, 2005, Third Revised edition 2009) Paperback

Edited by John Scott Previous edition also edited by Gordon Marshall , ISBN 13: 9780199683581, Year : 2014, Rs. 410 Rs. 369 (Free shipping within India only. No extras for postage and handling. )


A consistent best-seller, the wide-ranging and authoritative Dictionary of Sociology was first published in 1994 and contains more than 2,500 entries on the terminology, methods, concepts and thinkers in the field, as well as from the related fields of psychology, economics, anthropology, philosophy and political science. For this fourth edition, Professor John Scott has conducted a thorough review of all entries to ensure that they are concise, focused and up to date. Revisions reflect current intellectual debates and social conditions, particularly in relation to global and multi-cultural issues. New entries cover relevant contemporary concepts, such as climate change, social media, terrorism and intersectionality, as well as key living sociologists. This Dictionary is both an invaluable introduction to sociology for beginners and an essential source of reference for more advanced students and teachers. Salient Features Completely revised and up-to-date content, with new entries on topical areas such as climate change, social media, terrorism and intersectionality More than 2,500 clear, concise and authoritative entries Covers all aspects of sociology, from abolitionism to zeitgeist and includes in-depth entries on key topics including the sociology of migration, politics and religion Includes terms taken from a wide range of related fields, such as psychology, economics, anthropology, philosophy and political science Recommended entry-level web links, accessed and updated via the Dictionary of Sociology companion web page All entries thoroughly reviewed to ensure they are concise, focused and up to date New entries on global and multi-cultural topics such as climate change, social media, terrorism and intersectionality